Category Archives: Veteran Profile

WWI Fort Caswell Nurse Profile: Frances C. Boulware 1878-1941

To view this or another nurse profile at any time, click the “WWI Profile” link beside the nurse’s name on Fort Caswell WWI Nurses, which is also accessible by the blue button on the top right of the webpage.

Source: Findagrave
Inscription: Frances Cordelia Boulware; November 25, 1879; September 1, 1941

Frances Cordelia Boulware
Laurens, SC
Army Nurse Corps

Served:
August 12, 1918 – March 23, 1919
Fort Caswell, US Army Post Hospital:
August 12, 1918 – March 23, 1919

Frances Cordelia “Fannie” Boulware was born and raised in Laurens County, SC. There is a partial family tree in FamilySearch.

In the 1880 Census her father is listed as a farmer. There are two daughters and a son. Fannie, listed as three years old, is the second child and youngest daughter.

Her father passed away in 1895 [Source: Ancestry]. Several more children had been born. The 1900 Census shows a total of seven children were born, five (or six?) still living. Fannie is the oldest living at home, with three younger siblings.

Before her father died, the family was living on a large family farm in Cross Hill, SC, a rural community in Laurens County. The death of her father may have required a move into town. In 1900 they lived in the town of Laurens, SC, and her mother was a landlady. The 1900 Census shows seven people boarding with them. Fannie, age 22, and her 17 year old sister, Jane, were dressmakers.

This 1912 Laurens City Directory lists three of the Boulware women. Frances is listed as a nurse; Harriett, a milliner (maker of hats), and Mariah, their mother (she died later that year). [Source: Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA]

There were only five trained nurses listed in the same City Directory of 1912 (excerpt below).

This excerpt from a 1915 article names Fannie Boulware as secretary of the Graduate Nurses’ Association of South Carolina.

“Graduate Nurses to Meet Here in April.” The Greenville News, 19 April 1915, p. 2.

On August 12, 1918, Nurse Boulware volunteered for WWI service.

Source: The Laurens Advertiser, 28 Aug. 1918, p. 5.

At nearly 40 years of age, Nurse Boulware did not meet the initial age requirements for US Army nurses, between 25-35 years. As the war continued, these requirements were modified to include 21-45 years of age, as mentioned in the initial Fort Caswell nurse post. The clipping above stated she was planning to serve overseas. Due to her late entry, her service overseas was probably no longer needed. Thus, she completed her service at Fort Caswell and was discharged. Her South Carolina WWI Service Card is listed below.

BOULWARE, FRANCES C. Residence: Laurens SC. Born: Cross Hill SC Nov 25/79. Nurse Aug 12/18 from Civilian life. Fort Caswell NC to discharge. Honorable discharge Mch 23/19.
Source: South Carolina, General Assembly. The official roster of South Carolina soldiers, sailors and marines in the World War, 1917-18, volume 1, part 1. South Carolina State Library, 1929.

The 1920 Census shows she was back in Laurens, living with her sister Jane and her family. By 1930, she was living in Greenville, employed as the Head Nurse at the Furman University Infirmary [Source: various articles from Greenville newspapers reporting illness data]. It appears she remained in Greenville even when she was no longer able to work, as the 1940 Census shows.

Frances Cordelia Boulware passed away a year later, on September 1, 1941. She had been in a VA invalid’s home for nurses for 45 days. Her death certificate shows she had a bleeding stomach ulcer with possible liver cancer. Her obituary is shown below.

Miss Frances Boulware
LAURENS, Sept 1 – Miss Frances Boulware, widely known professional nurse of Laurens and Greenville, died today at Veterans’ hospital for nurses in Milledgeville, GA, after several years of declining health.

She was the daughter of the late Joseph R. and Maria Anderson Boulware of Laurens. She received her education in schools here and graduated as a nurse at Roper hospital, Charleston. During recent years she had lived in Greenville. Surviving are two sisters, Mrs. Fleming Smith and Mrs. Alva Weaver and a brother, David L. Boulware.

Funeral services will be at the Kennedy mortuary in Laurens at 11 a.m. Wednesday conducted by the Rev. L.P. McGee. Burial will be in Laurens cemetery.

Active pallbearers: W.R. and Jack Anderson, Lawrence Kennedy, L.C. Barksdale, E.O. Anderson, Everette Martin.

Honoary escort: R.E. and R.A. Babb, Dr. C.P. Vincent, Dr. T.L. Timmerman, H. Douglas Gray, L.G. Balle, M.L. Smith, Ralph Bobo, C.P. Roper, and Grover C. Peterson.
The Greenville News (Greenville, SC), 2 Sept. 1941, p. 6.

She was laid to rest in Laurens City Cemetery where her mother and later at least one sister were buried. No military service is shown.

If you would like to help us honor Frances Cordelia Boulware or another Brunswick County WWI veteran, please use the following links:

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WWI Fort Caswell Nurse Profile: Dora A. Bell 1892-1969

To view this or another nurse profile at any time, click the “WWI Profile” link beside the nurse’s name on Fort Caswell WWI Nurses, which is also accessible by the blue button on the top right of the webpage.

Source: Findagrave
Dora Alice Bell Harris
Cumberland, MD
Army Nurse Corps
2nd Lieutenant

Served:
March 22, 1918 – January 5, 1921
Fort Caswell, US Army Post Hospital:
March 22, 1918 – August 8, 1918
Overseas:
September 1, 1918 – November 25, 1919

Dora Alice “Dovie” Bell was born and raised in Pendleton County, WV, in the Appalachian Mountains near Western Maryland. There is a partial family tree in FamilySearch.

The 1900 Census shows the family having five children, all living. Dovie was the second oldest daughter, age 8. Her father was presumably a farmer, as listed on the 1910 Census.

Dora could not be found in the 1910 Census. However, the following articles from 1914 shows she was enrolled in the nursing training program at Western Maryland Hospital in Cumberland, MD, as well as Bellevue Hospital in NYC.

[Source for first clipping: Cumberland Evening Times, 30 June 1914, p. 9; Source for second clipping: Cumberland Evening Times, 31 Dec. 1914, p. 10.]

Nurse Bell is listed in the 1917 Cumberland City Directory.
[Source: Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA]

More news about Dora was found from June 30, 1918.

Another Nurse Leaves for Hospital Service

Tenth from Western Maryland Hospital to Enlist Since March 1 for Army Work
Miss Mildred Parsons, Kansas City, Kan., graduate nurse of the Western Maryland Hospital, leaves today to take up her duties at Base Hospital, No. A, Newport News. Miss Parsons is the tenth Western Maryland nurse to enlist since March 1. Those in service now are: Misses Matilda Duvall, Camp Dix, N.J.; Nola Lepley, Fort Bliss, El Paso, Texas; Martha Mont, Corpus Christi, Texas; Ethel Matlick, Walter Reid Hospital, Washington D.C.; Dora Bell, Greenville Hospital, North Carolina; Pearl McFarland, Hospital No. 1, Aberdeen, Md.; Mary A. Boyle and Edith Head, unassigned.

The Government is so much in need of nurses that it is felt the public should do all it can to relieve private duty nurses.
“Another Nurse Leaves for Hospital Service.” Cumberland Evening Times, 30 June 1918, p. 2.

Details of her US Army service may be found on her WWI MD Service Card, which is located in bound volumes, Maryland in the World War 1917-1919; Military and Naval Service Records, Volumes I & II, and is shown below in table form for easier reading. Her military service is not detailed after December 1919, although she remained in the service until January 1921.

03/22/1918 – 08/08/1918 Fort Caswell, NC
08/08/1918 – 09/01/1918 Mobilization Station
09/01/1918 – 10/12/1918 Base Hospital No. 60 (France)
10/12/1918 – 10/17/1918 Base Hospital No. 81 (France)
10/17/1918 – 04/09/1919 Provisional Hospital No. 1
04/09/1919 – 05/09/1919 Evacuation Hospital
05/09/1919 – 07/29/1919 Camp Hospital No. 33 (Brest, France)
07/29/1919 – 11/25/1919 Demobilization Station
11/25/1919 – 12/06/1919 Base Hospital; Fort Sam Houston, TX

The Passenger List below is for Aquitania, leaving NY on September 2, 1918, containing 8 pages of nurses in the Army Nurse Corps, for a total of over 200. This excerpt shows her mother as her next of kin, with her mother’s address as Elkins, WV. As mentioned in the introductory Fort Caswell nurse post, nurses were not assigned overseas service against their will.

Source: Ancestry.com. U.S., Army Transport Service, Passenger Lists, 1910-1939 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2016.

As her service card above shows, she moved assignments often while overseas. She was also the recipient of the Order of St. Sava (Serbian) Military Year: 1917-1919. No details were found regarding the award.

When she returned to the United State near the end of 1919, she continued service but as mentioned, details are unknown. Her final day of service was the date she was married, January 1, 1921.

On January 1, 1921, Dora A. Bell, graduate nurse from Elkins, WV, married Joseph M. Harris, US Army Officer currently living in Los Angeles.
Source of excerpt shown above: Ancestry.com. California, Marriage Records from Select Counties, 1850-1941 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.

Dora and Joseph remained in Los Angeles until their deaths. Joseph would eventually become a real estate broker, as shown in the 1930 Census. The 1940 Census includes three of Dora’s brother’s children. Curiously, the children are also listed that year in her brother Minor’s Census in WV. The reasons behind this are unknown.

No additional information or obituaries were found. Dora Alice Bell Harris passed away on June 29, 1969, in Los Angeles at age 76. She was laid to rest next to her husband at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale, CA.

If you would like to help us honor Dora Alice Bell Harris or another Brunswick County WWI veteran, please use the following links:

Click here for the announcement: Announcement: Honor a Brunswick County World War I Veteran
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WWI Fort Caswell Nurse Profile: Elizabeth F. Bachman 1892-1952

To view this or another nurse profile at any time, click the “WWI Profile” link beside the nurse’s name on Fort Caswell WWI Nurses, which is also accessible by the blue button on the top right of the webpage.

WWI Service Card from New York

Elizabeth Florence Bachman Williams
Allentown, PA
Army Nurse Corps

Served:
October 7, 1918 – March 14, 1919
Fort Caswell, US Army Post Hospital:
October 7, 1918 – March 14, 1919

Elizabeth “Bessie” Florence Bachman was born and raised in Allentown, PA.

The 1900 Census, when Bessie was 7 years old, listed her father as a produce salesman. The census indicates her mother had given birth to 5 children. Four were still living, all daughters. Bessie was the oldest. She and her younger sibling were attending school.

Her mother, Caroline, passed away suddenly from a heart ailment in 1907, when Bessie was 15. Her father remarried about seven months later; they would have no children together but a stepdaughter a few years younger than Bessie joined the family.

In 1910, Bessie was still living at home and was reported to be age 16, although likely 18. She and her younger sister were “tailoresses” at a manufacturing company. The younger sisters and stepsister were attending school.

By 1912, the Allentown City Directory shows Bessie living alone, no longer working as a tailoress. Source: Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA

Given the newspaper articles from 1915 shown below, she was likely training or preparing to train as a nurse at that time.

Mr. and Mrs. Charles D. Grim, of No. 1304 Hamilton street, have as their guests Mr. and Mrs. George Brady, of Reading; Mr. and Mrs. B Connor, of Philadelphia; and Miss Grace Gangwer, of Weatherly, who came on to attend the Hospital Day exercises at St. Luke’s Hospital, South Bethlehem. Mr. and Mrs. Grim’s niece, Miss Elizabeth Bachman, is a member of the graduating class of nurses.
The Morning Call (Allentown, PA), 20 Oct. 1915, p. 7.

Source: The Allentown Leader (Allentown, PA), 19 Oct. 1915, p. 1.
St. Luke’s Hospital is located in Bethlehem, about 9 miles from Allentown. It established a nursing school in 1884, the fourth in the nation and currently the oldest nursing school in the nation. The effect of the industrial revolution on Allentown meant that injured workers could no longer only depend on medical facilities in Philadelphia, needing a closer source. [Source: The History of St. Luke’s Hospital]


This photo, courtesy of St Luke’s School of Nursing, shows the graduating class of 1917, two years following Nurse Bachman’s.

Nurse Bachman completed post-graduate work in New York City at the Manhattan Maternity Hospital and Long Island Medical College [Source: Marriage announcement, below]. This may have been why her residence at the time of enlistment into the Army Nursing Corps was New York City. See NY WWI Service Card at top.

On October 4, 1918, Nurse Bachman enlisted in the Army Nursing Corps as Elizabeth F. Bachman. She served at Fort Caswell Post Hospital and was discharged on March 4, 1919.
[Sources: NY WWI Service Card and The American Journal of Nursing, Vol. 19, No. 3 (Dec., 1918), pp. 220, excerpt shown below]

After the war, she returned home to Allentown. In September, she became the first woman to be elected as a member of her local American Legion. The published story is printed below.

First Lady to Join H.P Lentz Post

Miss Elizabeth F. Bachman Was a Red Cross Nurse During the War
Setting the initiative for the ladies who were regularly enlisted in the military or naval forces of the United States during the World War, Miss Elizabeth F. Bachman, of No. 1304 Hamilton street, yesterday made application for enrollment as a full fledged member of Herbert Paul Lentz Post No. 29, The American Legion, and at the meeting last night in the court house she was duly elected, thus giving her the distinction of being the first enlisted female of Lehigh county and this community of becoming affiliated with the recognized veterans’ organization of the late war.

Miss Bachman left this city during the early period of the war, as a member of the Red Cross. She had some years ago been graduated as a registered nurse, and it was in this capacity that she served the United States. She was sent to some camp in South Carolina [North Carolina], along the Atlantic coast, and soon after her arrival her worth was easily established, and she was duly enlisted in the military service as a nurse in the Army Nurses’ Corps of the United States Army. She served continuously in this camp, which was a convalescent center, until the latter part of February, when she was honorably discharged from the service.

For a number of years, also, Miss Bachman had been the attending nurse to W.J. Grim, aged about eighty-five years, of 1304 Hamilton street, as he was most generally known to his associated. He is the father of the late Charles D. Grim of the same address. Her untiring efforts as nurse to Mr. Grim, Sr., she has endeared herself to the family, so that she is considered as one of the family.

The fact that the application for membership from Miss Bachman came unsolicited and purely from her own motives, brought a delightful surprise to the members of the Legion, at its meeting last evening. When the application was handed to a Legion member, she expressed the hope that her example would be a forerunner for all eligible ladies in the city and community to become affiliated with the organization.

The constitution of the American Legion states that any person, male or female, who was regularly enlisted or commissioned in the force of the United State between the period of April 6, 1917, and November 11, 1918, and who has been honorably discharged, may become enrolled as a member in any Post in the country. Ladies who are eligible under this head and who wish to become affiliated with the local Post, should communicate with the membership drive headquarters at the Chamber of Commerce rooms during this week, or with one of the officers of the organization.

[end of excerpt]

On January 14, 1929, Elizabeth was married to Benjamin W. Williams from NYC. The wedding announcement mentions her service at Fort Caswell.

Elizabeth F. Bachman to Wed N.Y. Attorney
Mrs. Charles D. Grim, of 1304 Hamilton street, announces the engagement of her niece, Elizabeth F. Bachman, to Benjamin W. Williams, prominent New York attorney and banker. The wedding is to take place in the First Presbyterian church, this city, some time in January.

Miss Bachman, a native of this city, is industrial nurse for the General Cigar company in this city. For several years she conducted work in the settlements of Henry street in New York city and during the World War served as a nurse in the base hospital at Ft. Caswell, N.C.

She is a graduate of St. Luke’s hospital, Bethlehem, a post-graduate of the Medical College of New York and the Manhattan Maternity hospital and dispensary, of New York city.
“Elizabeth F. Bachman to Wed N.Y. Attorney.” The Morning Call (Allentown, PA), 23 Oct. 1928, p. 16.

This story published after the ceremony inexplicably describes her service as being in the Gulf of Mexico. Their honeymoon trip includes North Carolina, which may indicate she wanted to return for a visit to Southport.

Elizabeth F. Bachman Weds Benj. Williams

At Pretty Ceremony at the Home of her Aunt, Mrs. Charles D. Grim
Miss Elizabeth F. Bachman, 1304 Hamilton street, and Benjamin Williams, Tottenville, N.Y., were united in marriage at a quiet home wedding on Tuesday night at 6 o’clock. Since the death of Miss Bachman’s mother several years ago she has been residing with her aunt, Mrs. Charles D. Grim, widow of Charles Grim, former chief of the Allentown fire department and well known coal dealer.

The Rev. S.K. Piercy, pastor of the First Presbyterian church, performed the ceremony which was witnessed only by relatives of the couple. Yellow tulips and caneldians were used as decorations and made an attractive setting for the bride who wore a wedding gown of gold imported lace, draped at the hip, with slippers to harmonize. Her bouquet was of orchids and fuchia.

Mrs. Charles Grim, aunt of the bride, was the matron of honor and wore a dress of beige crepe. Her bouquet was of sweet peas and fuchia. An uncle of Miss Bachman, Marshall Gagewere, Bethlehem, served as best man.

Following the ceremony the bridal party enjoyed a reception and dinner at the Hotel Bethlehem, after which the happy young couple left for their honeymoon trip. Palm Beach and other points of interest in Florida, as well as North Carolina, will be included in their trip, which will extend into May. Upon their return North Mr. and Mrs. Williams will receive their friends in their newly furnished home in Tottenville.

Mrs. Williams graduated from St. Luke’s hospital, Bethlehem; Manhattan Maternity hospital, New York, and the Long Island Medical College, Brooklyn. During the World War she did commendable work at the Gulf of Mexico, and since her return to Allentown has been filling the position of industrial nurse and welfare worker at the General Cigar Company, this city. Mrs. Williams was also a settlement worker in New York, and is a member of the American National State Organization of Nurses.

Mr. Williams is a prominent banker, realtor and lawyer of Tottenville. He is a graduate of Rutgers College and studies at Princeton. Popular in both business and fraternal circles, he is an active member of the Colonial Country Club of New Jersey. Mr. Williams is the son of the late Colonel W.L. Williams, of Kentucky.
“Elizabeth F. Bachman Weds Benj. Williams.” The Morning Call (Allentown, PA), 24 Jan. 1929, p. 7.

The 1930 and 1940 Census records indicate they remained in the same house at 73 Hopping Ave, Tottenville, NY, until her death.

Elizabeth Florence Bachman Williams passed away on November 15, 1952. She was 59 years old. The cause of death was liver cancer.

The following obituary was published.

Graduate Nurse Dies in Hospital
Mrs. Elizabeth Williams, 59, of 73 Hopping Avenue, Tottenville, N.Y., a graduate nurse of St. Luke’s Hospital, died at 6:15 p.m. Saturday in St. Luke’s Hospital.

Wife of Benjamin Williams, Mrs. Williams also donated a room to the hospital. She was born in Allentown July 11, 1893 a daughter of Erwin and Caroline Gangawer Bachman.

A member of Beauvais Hudson Post 126, American Legion Auxillary of Tottenville, and Richmond County Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, she is survived by her husband; three sisters, Mrs. W.P. Uhler, Tottenville; Mrs. Bernard Mahoney, Scarsdale, N.Y., and Mrs. Margaret Clauser, Allentown.
“Graduate Nurse Dies in Hospital.” The Morning Call (Allentown, PA), 17 Nov. 1952, p. 8.

She was laid to rest on Staten Island.

Her husband Benjamin requested a military flat marker which was presumably installed. No photo is available.

Curiosity about Tottenville led to a 2008 Landmark Preservation report which mentioned Benjamin and Elizabeth. Tottenville is on the Southern end of Staten Island and was quite isolated at the time. Many historic buildings are thankfully preserved. The following is the excerpt of the Landmarks Preservation Commission July 15, 2008, Designation List 404 LP- 2229.

Benjamin Williams, a successful Tottenville businessman, was born around 1871 in Newport, Kentucky. He attended schools in Cincinnati, Ohio, and New Brunswick, New Jersey, before settling on Staten Island ca. 1888. His wife, Elizabeth, was born in Pennsylvania. In the Standard Directory of Richmond County, 1893-94, his vocation is listed as “insurance,” a business he practiced for the rest of his life. Subsequent directories also specify “real estate.” Precisely why he came to Tottenville is not known. His arrival in the late 1880s is indicative of Tottenville’s growing prosperity and its attraction to professional businessmen. On Oct. 24, 1902, Williams purchased a lot at 73 Hopping Avenue. He soon built a house and came to reside at this prestigious address. He may have done business at more than one address, for some Staten Island directories give office addresses both on Main Street and Arthur Kill Road. He was a representative of the Insurance Company of North America for over 60 years. In 1906 Williams was one of the organizers of the Tottenville National Bank. He became vice president and later president of the bank board. He was treasurer of the Richmond County Savings and Loan Association and a member of the Chase Manhattan Bank advisory board when that bank took over the Tottenville bank in the 1950s. Benjamin Williams died on December 29, 1957.

If you would like to help us honor Elizabeth Florence Bachman Williams or another Brunswick County WWI veteran, please use the following links:

Click here for the announcement: Announcement: Honor a Brunswick County World War I Veteran
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WWI Fort Caswell Nurse Profile: Anna Andis 1889-1943

To view this or another nurse profile at any time, click the “WWI Profile” link beside the nurse’s name on Fort Caswell WWI Nurses, which is also accessible by the blue button on the top right of the webpage.

Source: Findagrave
Anna Lucille “Lou” Andis Cleveland
Johnson City, TN
Army Nurse Corps

Served:
October 5, 1918 – January 15, 1919
Fort Caswell, US Army Post Hospital:
October 5, 1918 – January 15, 1919

Anna Lucille “Lou” Andis was born and raised in Jonesville, VA.

The 1900 Census, when Lou was 11 years old, listed her father as a farmer. There were eight children, all living. Lou was the third eldest sibling and the eldest daughter. Her older brothers were working on the family farm. All siblings over age 5 were reportedly reading, writing, and attending school.

In 1910, Lou was living in Johnson City, TN, with her younger sister who had recently married. Lou’s brother-in-law was employed as a salesman. Lou was employed as a trained nurse.

According to The Comet (Johnsonville, TN), 01 Jul 1909; p.1; her younger sister’s marriage was “a notable event in social circles.” Lou served as maid of honor. The bride was reportedly a “most popular young lady” and the groom “is a successful young business man of Johnson City, where he holds a responsible position with the Summers-Parrott Hardware company.”

Jonesville, VA, is in the far western part of Virginia. Johnson City, TN, is actually east of Jonesville, VA, and NE of Asheville, NC, about halfway between Jonesville, VA, and Asheville.

The 1913 Johnson City, TN, City Directory, the earliest directory in which Lou appears, shows Lucile Andes (both names misspelled) as an apprentice nurse at Memorial Hospital, living at the hospital. It was common to live at the hospital while training.
Source: Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA,

The next year, the nurses were listed in the City Directory as shown. It is assumed that Lou had completed the training program.
Source: Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA

On October 5, 1918, Lou enlisted in the Army Nursing Corps as Anna Andis. She served at Fort Caswell Post Hospital and was discharged on January 15, 1919.
Source: The American Journal of Nursing, Vol. 19, No. 3 (Dec., 1918), pp. 60, excerpt shown below

Lou’s younger brother Guy Herbert Andis served in WWI in the 117th Infantry, 30th “Old Hickory” Division.
Source: World War Record of Ex-Soldiers of Washington County, State of Tennessee; Page 10

Lou remained in Johnson City, TN, according to city directories until some time after 1935. She married Wilbur Cleveland in Miami, FL, sometime before the 1940 Census. (Wilbur divorced a woman named Ann in 1936, then married Anna Lucille “Lou” Andis, which created complications due to their similar names.)

Wilbur and Lou remained married until her death, as her death certificate shows. Lou died in 1943, at age 54, after spending 6 months in the VA Hospital in Asheville, NC. The cause of death was cervical cancer.

The following obituaries were published.

Mrs. Wilbur Cleveland
A nurse of World War I, Mrs. Wilbur Cleveland, 50, died in a hospital in Asheville, N.C., Wednesday morning. Word of her death was received by a brother-in-law and sister-in-law, Mr. And Mrs. Charles W. Cleveland, 1227 S. W. 11th ave. The deceased had lived in Miami at 3030 S. W. 25th terrace the last five years, coming here from Asheville. She was well known here, in North Carolina and in Tennessee as a nurse. Funeral services will be held in her home town, Johnson City, Tenn.
The Miami News, 30 Sept. 1943, p. 13.

Mrs. Wilbur Cleveland
Mrs. Wilbur Cleveland of Miami, Fla., formerly of Johnson City, Tenn., died yesterday at 8:30 a.m. in an Asheville hospital following an illness of several months.

The body will be sent by the Morris-Gearing funeral home to Johnson City for funeral services and burial today. The Morris funeral home will be in charge of services in Johnson City.

Mrs. Cleveland, a nurse in World War I, is survived by her husband, Wilbur Cleveland of Miami; her mother, Mrs. W.H. Andis of 22 Kenilworth road, and four sisters, Mrs. George M. Hyder of 22 Kenilworth road, Mrs. Alton Riley of New Town, Ind., and Mrs. M.S. Smith of Roanoke, Va., and Mrs. Lon Smith of Jonesville, Va.
Asheville Citizen-Times (Asheville, NC), 30 Sept. 1943, p. 2.

Anna Lucille Andis Cleveland was laid to rest in Johnson City, TN. Her husband Wilbur passed away over 30 years later.

Four years later, in 1947, a military flat marker was ordered for her gravesite. The marker was requested by Mrs. John W. Moulton. Her connection to Lou is unclear.

If you would like to help us honor Anna Lucille “Lou” Andis Cleveland or another Brunswick County WWI veteran, please use the following links:

Click here for the announcement: Announcement: Honor a Brunswick County World War I Veteran
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WWI Profile: Harry Clayton Chinnis 1888-1946

To view this or an earlier profile at any time, click on the veteran’s name on the WWI Brunswick County Veteran list, which is also accessible by the blue button on the top right of the webpage.

Photo courtesy of Jane B. Henry.
Private Harry Chinnis (right) is Jane B. Henry’s maternal grandmother’s brother.

Harry Clayton Chinnis
Winnabow, Brunswick County, NC
US Army
Private, First Class

Served:
October 7, 1917 – August 9, 1919
Overseas:
April 24, 1918 – August 1, 1919

Harry Clayton Chinnis was born and raised in Brunswick County. A family tree is located in FamilySearch. Harry had a brother who also served, Joseph Wheeler Chinnis. Joseph had enlisted in the National Guard in 1916 when he was 18 years old, then served in WWI with the 119th Infantry, 30th “Old Hickory” Division. In 1922, he enlisted in the US Navy, serving in WWII. He retired in 1948.

Harry’s WWI Draft Registration shows he was single, living in Winnabow, and working in a sawmill in Bolivia.

Harry was married in April 1917, then ordered to report for military duty on October 3, 1917 [Source: Ancestry]. He and five other men were sent to Camp Jackson for training. Pvt Chinnis’ NC WWI Service Card shows he was serving with the 331st Infantry, but it appears to be a typo and should read 321st Infantry, 81st “Wildcat” Division. This assumption is based on the training camp and the assignments of the five men who were drafted with him.

The 5th Division was organized in December and Pvt Chinnis was transferred in February 1918 to the 11th Infantry. Some information about the division and other Brunswick County men who served can be found starting with Pvt Barfie Randel Long’s WWI Profile. Pvt Chinnis left for France in April.

Pvt Chinnis did not take part in the operation detailed in Pvt Long’s profile. A new branch of service in the Army for the Military Police was formed in July 1918. In August, Pvt Chinnis became a member of this new branch, assigned to III Corps, MP Company.

The US Army realized an increased and focused Military Police force was necessary due to the volume of prisoners of war, the challenges of traffic control, and the responsibilities typical for a police force. Merely controlling traffic had become overwhelming due to the number of troops, vehicles, and horses trying to navigate the muddy conditions in France. Gridlock often forced delays in operations.

Recall from Cpl Herbert Ward’s WWI Profile the description of the first All American Offensive at St. Mihiel at the beginning of September 1918, an operation that was secret and therefore required night marches:

The weather was one continuous downpour of rain; the roads were slippery and wound over steep hills and through wet woods; as the organization approached the lines the traffic on the highways grew denser and denser until those arteries were solid-streams of vehicles and men, with a current in each direction.

Orders were that the artillery should be in the sector and in position by September 8th; but the enormous traffic on the roads, the scarcity and wretched condition of the horses and the incessant rain made it impossible to complete the march on time. Forage was scarce, water was often unobtainable. Horses died along the road or had to be abandoned to the mercy of French peasants. The muddy ground made the entrances and exits of woods extremely difficult; sometimes as much as three hours were consumed merely in getting organizations out of the woods and on the road. The strain on men and animals was terrific. Sleep was almost unheard of.

The following continues that description. [From the same source The Official History of the Fifth Division]:

The M.P.’s were given their first real test in handling the traffic on the roads leading to the front. They were handicapped by lack of experience in such jams. Officers and men exhausted themselves in the gigantic task of keeping the roads clear, many doing forty-eight-hour shifts without sleep.

One M. P. knew his job thoroughly. As this traffic cop was patrolling a road reserved for animal-drawn transportation, a big automobile tried to force its way through. The M. P. promptly halted the machine, with the threat, “I’ll shoot if you move another inch.” He probably didn’t notice the four stars. The Commander-in-Chief of the A. E. F. alighted from his auto and congratulated the private with the remark, “You are the first M. P. I have found doing his duty.”


The photograph of Pvt Chinnis at top can be enlarged to show many details of his uniform. On the lower half of his left sleeve, his chevron shows he has served six months overseas. His MP armband is also on his left sleeve. Overseas, the Americans adopted the British style shown here, black wool with the red “MP” cut in red felt. [Source] His shoulder insignia is III Corps.

October 1918, he was promoted to Private, First Class.

Pfc Chinnis boarded USS Minnesotan on July 23, 1919, and was honorably discharged on August 9, 1919. The 1920 Census lists him living with his wife’s family in Town Creek, working in a sawmill. He later owned and farmed his land and raised a daughter with his wife.

Tragically, Harry Clayton Chinnis committed suicide on July 7, 1946, at age 57, an apparent reaction to his failing health, according to a local newspaper article. He was laid to rest at Vines Cemetery in Winnabow. Military honors are shown.

If you would like to help us honor Harry Clayton Chinnis or another Brunswick County WWI veteran, please use the following links:

Click here for the announcement: Announcement: Honor a Brunswick County World War I Veteran
Click here for directions to donate and honor a veteran: How to Honor a Brunswick County World War I Veteran

Click the category: Veteran Profile here or at the bottom of any veteran profile post to see all of the veteran profiles published. Follow or subscribe to the blog to stay updated on all new profiles.

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WWI Profile: William Winfield Millinor 1890-1926

To view this or an earlier profile at any time, click on the veteran’s name on the WWI Brunswick County Veteran list, which is also accessible by the blue button on the top right of the webpage.

Photo contributed by Jane B. Henry.
Private Millinor is her paternal grandmother’s brother.
William Winfield Millinor
Fish Factory, Brunswick County, NC
US Army
Private
Served:
April 2, 1918 – December 11, 1919

William “Willie” Winfield Millinor was born and raised in Brunswick County, NC. A partial family tree is located in FamilySearch.

The 1900 Census and the 1910 Census show him living in Southport with his parents.

On December 16, 1913, Willie married Katie Gore. Their only child was born the following year, September 16, 1914, which is also the date of death of Katie Millinor, apparently dying during childbirth.

His WWI Draft Registration shows he was living in Southport, single (actually widowed), supporting one child, and working as a laborer for Captain J.F. Bussells at Neptune Fisheries. According to newspapers at the time, Neptune removed the oil from the fish and used the scrap for fertilizer.

Willie was ordered to report for duty on April 2, 1918 [Source:Ancestry] and sent to Camp Jackson, NC.

On April 24, he went to Medical Detachment, Embarkation Hospital, at Camp Stuart, VA. At the same time, Brunswick County Privates Guy Ellis Watson and Roy McKeithan (later Sgt) were assigned, presumably making the trip with him.

Note: More Brunswick County men could have served there. NC WWI Service cards of those serving in Medical Detachment units do not always include the location of the hospital.

The WWI Profile for Guy Ellis Watson included some details of the responsibilities of those serving at the Camp Stuart hospital. It is not known what role Private Millinor held. Camp Stuart was the largest single embarkation camp of the war and the hospital served an important role in sending healthy soldiers to France.

On February 22, 1919, Private Millinor was transferred from the embarkation hospital to the debarkation hospital as the focus turned from sending soldiers to France to receiving the returning soldiers.

Private Millinor was honorably discharged in December 11, 1919, serving longer than usual, likely due to being crucial for processing soldiers from overseas.

In 1920, it appears that his parents (C.T. Milander) and one brother (C.C. Milander) and his family were living in Southport. Willie could not be located in census records, although his son, George Atwood Millinor, was located in Town Creek, living with his maternal grandmother.

William “Willie” Winfield Millinor died in a one-car accident, hitting a telegraph pole, on August 22, 1926, at the age of 35. He was laid to rest in Drew Cemetery in Winnabow. No photograph is available to verify whether military honors are shown.

Source: The Medical Department of the United States Army in the World War, Volume IV, Activities Concerning Mobilization Camps and Ports of Embarkation. Washington : US Govt Printing Office : 1928, Chapter 24

If you would like to help us honor William Winfield Millinor or another Brunswick County WWI veteran, please use the following links:

Click here for the announcement: Announcement: Honor a Brunswick County World War I Veteran
Click here for directions to donate and honor a veteran: How to Honor a Brunswick County World War I Veteran

Click the category: Veteran Profile here or at the bottom of any veteran profile post to see all of the veteran profiles published. Follow or subscribe to the blog to stay updated on all new profiles.

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WWI Profile: John William Lancaster 1895-1988

To view this or an earlier profile at any time, click on the veteran’s name on the WWI Brunswick County Veteran list, which is also accessible by the blue button on the top right of the webpage.

Photo contributed by Marilyn Aldridge Swain, granddaughter.
John William Lancaster
Grifton, Pitt County, NC
US Army
Private
Served:
October 5, 1917 – March 31, 1919
Overseas:
May 10, 1918 – March 22, 1919

John William Lancaster was born and raised in Supply, Brunswick County, the only son of seven children. A partial family tree is located in FamilySearch.

The 1910 Census, where he was reported as 14 years old, shows he was working on the family farm in Supply. The neighboring farms included boys his age such as Herman Dan Fulford, Samuel Goodman Fulford, and John Hillery Caison, all wounded during WWI. With 60 men from Supply who served in WWI, the community and their generation clearly felt the effects of the war.

Willie’s draft registration from 1917 shows he was single, now living in Grifton (Pitt County), and employed by E.W. Causey for farming. (His name was written as “Willie” in the signature.)

Willie was ordered to report for duty on September 18, 1917, [Source: Ancestry] then sent to Camp Jackson, SC, for training. Although the date he and the men arrived at Camp Jackson was recorded as October 7, his final acceptance did not occur until November 16, 1917. Only four of the 19 men were recorded as having a final acceptance at this date.

The most likely explanation may be found in Carl Jefferson Danford’s WWI Profile, which described the quarantines occurring in Southern camps at this time. Because many men were living in isolated areas, when they joined together in camps, illnesses which had otherwise not circulated were suddenly active and spread easily. Measles, in particular, is extremely contagious. It often leads to pneumonia, which was the cause of death for Carl Danford. It’s possible that Willie had contracted measles or mumps and needed to recover before his final acceptance.

Checking the other three men who were drafted with Willie and experienced a month delay until final acceptance, the NC WWI Service Cards of (Craven County men) William T Atkinson, Lee J French, and Joseph C Grady show they spent time in the infirmary. Despite Willie’s NC WWI Service Card not indicating time in the infirmary, it is the likely explanation. Like all historical documents, the service cards have been shown to have inaccuracies.

Because of the delay while in the infirmary, all four men were not assigned to infantry like the other men ordered to duty at the same time, but were placed in the Medical Detachments in sanitary trains/ambulance companies. Their survival of what was likely measles may have spared them the fates of Willie’s neighbors mentioned above, all serving in the infantry. However, we know from Robert Guy Farmer’s WWI Profile that the cause of death during WWI, either serving in the military or not, was most likely from influenza. (Of the 2,370 NC military deaths, 1,542 died of disease; 13,644 non-military NC deaths were reported from influenza. That’s over 12,000 more deaths from influenza while safely at home.)

Pvt Lancaster was a member of the Medical Detachment for the 115th Machine Gun Battalion.

Headquarters Company and Medical Detachment of the 115th Machine Gun Battalion; March 25, 1919
[Source: NC Archives]


In the photo above, Pvt Lancaster is in the second row, seventh from the left. The 115th Machine Gun Battalion was in the 30th “Old Hickory” Division, the division which included most Brunswick County men. To read more about the experiences of the division, start with Samuel Claudius Swain’s WWI Profile.

Boarding SS Haverford in Philadelphia on May 11, 1918 [Source: Ancestry], Pvt Lancaster and the 115th Machine Gun Battalion began the trip to France.

Haverford was named for a suburb in Philadelphia and was launched in May 1901. Beginning in 1915, the ship was used for British troop transportation. In 1917, it was damaged by a German U-boat torpedo. After six months of repairs, in April 1918, it was again damaged by a German submarine. Pvt Lancaster and the 115th Machine Gun Battalion boarded it the next month.

After the war, it returned to passenger service and was scrapped in 1925.

Source: National Archives

This photo from the National Archives shows a soldier in the 115th Machine Gun Battalion. Pvt Lancaster served in the Medical Detachment for the battalion. There is little information available online regarding the training and duties. Enlisted men were chosen to provide treatment of casualties in the trenches or carrying the injured men to company aid stations.

After the war ended, on March 10, 1919, Pvt Lancaster sailed on USS Finland from St. Nazaire, France, to Newport News, VA, arriving on March 23, 1919 [Source: Ancestry]. He was mustered out on March 31, 1919. The Field Artillery of the 30th Division had sailed with Pvt Lancaster and the machine gun battalion, but most of the 30th Division did not depart France until April 1 due to a last minute change to send the division to land at Charleston, SC. This left most of the 30th Division very disappointed.

Source: NC Archives
The 115th Machine Gun Battalion’s Banner is now in the care of the NC Museum of History.

Almost immediately after returning to America, on May 4, 1919, Willie married Oran Thelma Sellers in her home. According to the 1920 Census, they settled in Wilmington while he worked in furniture sales.

Ten years later, the 1930 Census shows three children, John, Jr, Victoria (“Vickie”), and Jessie. The family now resided on Dry Street in Southport, with John a grocery store merchant.

Sadly, his wife Oran Thelma Sellers Lancaster fell into a diabetic coma at age 38 and passed away on August 18, 1937. She was laid to rest in Sabbath Home Baptist Church Cemetery in Holden Beach. Her obituary was published on the front page of The State Port Pilot on August 25, 1937.

Funeral Services for Mrs. Lancaster
Funeral services for Mrs. John W. Lancaster, 40, who died at her home here Wednesday morning, were conducted Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock from the cemetery at Sabbath Home Baptist church, six miles southwest of Supply. The services were in charge of the Rev. A.L. Brown, pastor of the Southport Baptist church.

The death of Mrs. Lancaster, wife of one of Southport’s leading business men, was unexpected. She had been ill only four days.

In addition to the husband, Mrs. Lancaster is survived by three children, John, Victoria, and Jesse Lancaster, four brothers, C.L., R.E., Hubbard and Yates Sellers, all of Brunswick County, and one half-brothers, E. Sellers of Whiteville; four sisters, Mrs. W.J. Sellers, of Supply; Mrs. J.W. Hewett, of Southport; Mrs. J.N. Lancaster, of Supply, and Mrs. B.K. Caison of Southport and one half-sister, Mary Lou Sellers of Whiteville.

Pearl Harbor was bombed by the Japanese on December 7, 1941. Within a few weeks, their son, John, Jr, enlisted in the US Navy, serving throughout WWII. When the war ended, this was published in The State Port Pilot on December 12, 1945, page 3.

Expected Home
John W. Lancaster, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. J.W. Lancaster of Southport, was one of the 2,000 high point Navy veterans who arrived in San Francisco the first of this month aboard the USS West Virginia. The West Virginia left Pearl Harbor on November 23rd as a part of the “Magic Carpet” fleet. It is understood that young Lancaster will have received his discharge and return home this week.

Note: At the end of WWII, Operation Magic Carpet was the 14 month operation to return almost 8 million Allied military personnel home. USS West Virginia made three trips from Hawaii to transport veterans home. “High-point” personnel were those first in line for discharge, while “low-point” personnel were the replacements.

On July 3, 1988, at age 92, John William Lancaster, Sr, passed away. The following was published in The Brunswick Beacon, July 7, 1988, page 4-B.

John William Lancaster, Sr.
John William Lancaster, Sr., 92, of Route 1, Supply, died July 3 at his residence.

The funeral was held July 5 in the Brunswick Chapel of Coble Wardsmith Funeral Service, Supply, with Rev. Franklin Myers and Rev. Weston Varnam officiating. Burial was in Sabbath Home Baptist Church Cemetery.

Born in Brunswick County on Oct. 3, 1895, he was the son of the late Jessie L. and Victoria Holden Lancaster. He owned and operated a general mercantile store in the Holden Beach area for many years. He was a World War I U.S. Army veteran, serving in France during the battle for the Hindenburg Line.

Survivors include his wife, Mrs. Susie Clemmons Lancaster of the home; a son, John W. Lancaster Jr. of Supply; three daughters, Mrs. Victoria Aldridge of Southport, Mrs. Jessie Walker of Wilmington and Mrs. Geraldine (Jeri) Hatcher of Supply; 11 grandchildren; 12 great-grandchildren and four step great-great-grandchildren.

Source: Findagrave
John William Lancaster was laid to rest in Sabbath Home Baptist Church Cemetery with military honors.

If you would like to help us honor John William Lancaster or another Brunswick County WWI veteran, please use the following links:

Click here for the announcement: Announcement: Honor a Brunswick County World War I Veteran
Click here for directions to donate and honor a veteran: How to Honor a Brunswick County World War I Veteran

Click the category: Veteran Profile here or at the bottom of any veteran profile post to see all of the veteran profiles published. Follow or subscribe to the blog to stay updated on all new profiles.

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WWI Profile: John Daniel Eriksen 1888-1961

To view this or an earlier profile at any time, click on the veteran’s name on the WWI Brunswick County Veteran list, which is also accessible by the blue button on the top right of the webpage.

Photos courtesy of Trudy Young, his great niece.
John Daniel Eriksen
Southport, Brunswick County, NC
US Army
Wagoner

Served:
September 18, 1917 – March 27, 1919
Overseas:
March 4, 1918 – March 11, 1919

John (Johan) Daniel Eriksen was born in Norway and immigrated to America in 1906, according to his Naturalization Declaration of Intention on June 30, 1916 found in Ancestry. There is a family tree in FamilySearch.

The 1891 Norway Census record for Arendal, Norway [Source: Ancestry] shows his parents were Lars Eriksen (b.1851) and Thalette Bergitte Thorgrimsen Eriksen (b.1862), married July 20, 1886. Besides Johan Daniel (b.Feb.1889), there was Einar Johan (b.1887) – should be Einar Andreas. Eventually, there were eleven children, according to Trudy Young, John’s great niece who still lives in Southport.

Trudy shared the following.

“John was one of 11 children and left home at 14 to be a cabin boy on a ship. His parents told him 2 years, and he had to come back to go to engineering school. He went back 30 years later to visit his mother.”

John signed his Declaration of Intention in 1916 as mentioned above. He was living in Southport at that time. He then married Esther Dosher on December 2, 1916 in Southport (John stated on the marriage certificate that his father was dead and mother was living).

He registered for the WWI Draft as required, on June 5, 1917. He stated he was employed as an Engineer in Southport for C.E. Gause, Esther’s brother-in-law, Charles Eyden Gause. He also stated he was a citizen of Norway but had declared his intention for citizenship.

On September 18, 1917, he was ordered to report for duty [Source: Ancestry]. Like many of the Brunswick County draftees, he was sent to Camp Jackson and trained with the 81st “Wildcat” Division. He was assigned to the Headquarters Company of the 322nd Infantry.

In January 1918, he was transferred out of the 81st Division and within a month, became a member of the 56th Engineers (Searchlight), where he remained throughout the war.

Previous to the great war, searchlights had been developed in the United States Army for coast defense and for battle illumination. Their principal use had been fixed installations in harbor defense, although experiments had been made in the development of mobile units for battlefield illumination.

After experimentation on the French and British fronts followed by investigation work in Washington Barracks, D.C., it was apparent that personnel must be assembled and trained for searchlight service.

The 56th Engineers (Searchlight) was authorized in January 1918. Personnel was formed with transfers from other units, such as Pvt Ericksen, drafts, and voluntary enlistment.

The 56th Engineers had diverse duties from experimental work and development of their own equipment to front line service with the British, French, and American armies in anti-aircraft defense against the night bomber.

Because each platoon was developed as an operating unit by itself, the unit was often isolated and many never saw their other comrades.

Insignia at right is an actual hand-sewn insignia on a uniform pictured online.

Trudy Young provided not only the photo shown at top, but letters written to his wife Esther during the war. In his letters, he often mentions that Esther should not worry because he was not serving in the trenches.

Of special interest to the Friends of Fort Caswell Rifle Range are his experiences at the rifle range during his training at Washington Barracks. These trips were not pleasant for him. On one trip, his pants and raincoat were stolen and he was required to pay $3.57 to replace them, although it seems he believed that insurance would reimburse his money. In another letter, he mentions he will be leaving for the rifle range again tomorrow, Tuesday, February 5, 1918. He expected to remain there until Saturday, February 16. He shared this about his stay.

“The mud here is something terrible. It is from 6 to 10 inches deep and just as soft as jelly. My feet been wet since I been here. I change socks twice a day but they stay cold. I am so dirty I feel right bad. I haven’t had a good face wash since I been here. We can’t get enough water.”

After returning from the 11 days on the range, he writes, “It was just plain H-L down on the Range. We even had to work at night. I made Marksman down there and I guess I would have made more if I hadn’t had a toothache […] and had it bad while I was shooting. I never had my shirt or pants off while I was down at the Range and believe me, I took a bath last night even though it was cold.”

Pvt Eriksen served in Company A, organized March 2, 1918, and traveled to Hoboken, NJ, on March 3 with 153 men and 2 officers. They left for France on March 6 on Tenadores, arriving in Bordeaux on March 21.

Pvt Eriksen was promoted to Private First Class in August and transferred to Company E, which is the roster which includes his name in the unit history, seen at left. From his letters, he appears to have stayed at Champigny during the months at war. As his letters could not include information about his activities, we look to the unit history, which states, “the action on enemy planes was most successful, as no enemy planes succeeded in penetrating the area covered by the lights.”

Pfc Eriksen mentions “Willis” in his letters home, which could be Pfc Willis from the roster shown. Other men are mentioned in his letters. At least one, Early Howell, appears in another roster in the unit history. His letters also mention his mother and siblings.

In November, three platoons including his were transferred to Company G. From his letters, he was not pleased at the transfer because his previous Company E returned home soon after. But the Searchlights again justified their presence as several bombing raids occurred and caused no damage because the planes were forced to fly higher altitudes to avoid the searchlights.

In December, Pfc Eriksen became a Wagoner and waited to return home. His letters mention tending the horses and no mention of travel or hauling equipment. Read Jackson Berry Potter’s WWI Profile for more information about the responsibilities of Wagoners.

On February 26, 1919, he embarked at St. Nazaire on the USS Nansemond, arriving at Newport News on March 11, 1919. His letters mention that because of a gale, the trip took longer than expected so supplies were low. They were only allowed two meals each day, so he was always hungry.

Upon arrival, the engineers were demobilized at Camp Morrison, VA.

After the war, John captained menhaden boats for the Brunswick Navigation Company. He signed a Petition of Naturalization on May 11, 1920 to become a citizen, as he had completed more than the five years of residency required [Source: Ancestry]. A Certificate appears to have been issued to him that day.

On November 20, 1920, his brother Hakon Ericksen, passed away in Southport. He was laid to rest in Old Smithville Cemetery (note that the year of death is incorrect and does not match his death certificate). Hakon’s death certificate indicates he had lived in Southport since June of that year.

John Eriksen served as mayor of Southport from 1935 to 1949.

Source: The State Port Pilot, Sept. 23, 1936, front page

Southport’s Sea-Going Mayor Extends Welcome to Visitors

Mayor John Eriksen is Captain of Menhaden Fish Boat Anderson And Is Experienced Seaman

Mayor John Eriksen typifies the hospitality of Southport citizens when he extends a hearty welcome to sportsmen of this state to visit here during the next few weeks and enjoy hunting and fishing that is unequaled in North Carolina.

Captain John didn’t think much of having his picture taken for the paper, but he agreed to stand still long enough for one shot to be made. He is shown above in his sea going clothes.

Southport’s mayor is captain of the menhaden fishboat Anderson. He is recognized as one of the best fisherman on the coast and is one of the most popular men in Southport.

He was born in Norway, but came to the United States before the World War. He married a Southport girl and made his home here.

Last year he was elected mayor of Southport and he has filled that office with marked efficiency. He is also senior warden of the St. Phillips Episcopal church.

John Daniel Eriksen passed away on January 17, 1961, at the Veterans Administration Hospital in Fayetteville. He was laid to rest in Old Smithville Cemetery in Southport. A military flat marker is displayed.

John and Esther had no children. He was Trudy Young’s great-uncle, and was like another father to her. She remains in the house in Southport where he lived most of his life.

Sources:
Trudy Young shared letters her great uncle wrote during the war, which can be found here.

Macomber and Brunet (1920) The 56th Engineers in the World War. Albany, The Brandon Printing Co. [Includes Rosters]

If you would like to help us honor John Daniel Eriksen or another Brunswick County WWI veteran, please use the following links:

Click here for the announcement: Announcement: Honor a Brunswick County World War I Veteran
Click here for directions to donate and honor a veteran: How to Honor a Brunswick County World War I Veteran

Click the category: Veteran Profile here or at the bottom of any veteran profile post to see all of the veteran profiles published. Follow or subscribe to the blog to stay updated on all new profiles.

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WWI Profile: Frederick Arnold Willetts 1895-1972

To view this or an earlier profile at any time, click on the veteran’s name on the WWI Brunswick County Veteran list, which is also accessible by the blue button on the top right of the webpage.

Photo contributed by Mary Willetts Earp, niece.
Frederick Arnold Willetts
Winnabow, Brunswick County, NC
US Army
Private
Served:
August 25, 1918 – October 29, 1918

Frederick Arnold Willetts was born and raised in Winnabow, Brunswick County. Two of his brothers also served, George Finnis Willetts and William Edgar Willetts.

Because Frederick was not yet 21 when the 1917 draft registration was held, he registered for the draft in 1918. His Draft Registration shows he was living in Winnabow and working on the family farm. His physical description was tall, slender, with dark blue eyes and light hair.

Frederick was the third Willetts brother to receive the order to report for duty. He reported for duty on August 26, 1918, and was sent to Camp Jackson, SC [Source: Ancestry]. He was assigned to 156th Depot Brigade for training.

Source: Library of Congress

The construction of Camp Jackson began on June 11, 1917. The first soldiers arrived on June 22. Construction was completed on December 22, 1917.

Recall from Richard Herbert Gray’s WWI profile, the 81st Division was responsible for much of the construction and organization at Camp Jackson until they moved to Camp Sevier in May 1918.

The Depot Brigade was to receive recruits, train them, then send them where needed. In some cases, recruits required physical training for the rehabilitation of injuries or health related issues. Camp Jackson’s Depot Brigade was the 156th.

Pvt Willetts was honorably discharged two months later on October 29, 1918, with a Surgeon’s Certificate of Disability and a 12 1/2 percent disability, indicating that the disability was a result of his military service. The General Pension Act of 1862 also included compensation for diseases incurred while in service, such as tuberculosis.

One clue into his disability is the date he was honorably discharged: October 29, 1918. The country was suffering from the influenza pandemic and southern camps in particular were hit hard with common childhood diseases such as the measles, as mentioned earlier in Carl Jefferson Danford’s WWI Profile.

It seems likely that Pvt Willetts contracted one of the illnesses which caused the camps to be quarantined, such as measles. A chronic condition that contributed to his death has been linked to measles. He could have suffered from influenza and pneumonia, causing damage to his lungs. Or it could have been a completely unrelated injury. But this is all guesswork based on records of other injuries sustained by soldiers during training.

After his discharge, Fred settled in Wilmington, working as a carpenter. He married and raised a family.

Frederick Arnold Willetts passed away on June 9, 1972, after several months in the VA Hospital in Fayetteville. His brother, William Edgar Willetts died just three days later.

On June 10, 1972, the following obituary was published in The Wilmington Morning Star.

Fred Willetts

Fred Willetts of Rt. 5  died in the Veterans Administration Hospital in Fayetteville Friday morning following a lengthy illness.

Mr. Willetts was a retired carpenter and was the son of the late W.H. and Annie Arnold Willetts.

Survivors include his wife, Mrs. Virgie Russ Willetts of the home; a son, Robert Arnold Willetts of Carolina Beach; four brothers, William A. Willetts of Wilmington; F.S. Willetts of Ingold; J.C. (Grimes) Willetts of Winnabow; S.D. Willetts of Supply, two sisters, Mrs. Eliza Singletary of Supply, Mrs. Eula Bolling of Leland; two grandsons.

Funeral services will be held Sunday at 2 pm at the Chapel of Andrews Mortuary, with the Rev. John D. Stitt officiating. Burial will be in Greenlawn Memorial Park.

The family will receive visitors from 7:30 to 8:30 pm Saturday at Andrews Mortuary.

He was laid to rest in Greenlawn Memorial Park Cemetery in Wilmington. A military flat marker is shown.

Read more about the Willetts brothers here: Willetts brothers honored with a family donation

Source:
US Army Basic Training Combat Museum (2016) The Birth of Camp Jackson. Fort Jackson, S.C., The R. L. Bryan co.

If you would like to help us honor Frederick Arnold Willetts or another Brunswick County WWI veteran, please use the following links:

Click here for the announcement: Announcement: Honor a Brunswick County World War I Veteran
Click here for directions to donate and honor a veteran: How to Honor a Brunswick County World War I Veteran

Click the category: Veteran Profile here or at the bottom of any veteran profile post to see all of the veteran profiles published. Follow or subscribe to the blog to stay updated on all new profiles.

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WWI Profile: William Edgar Willetts 1890-1972

To view this or an earlier profile at any time, click on the veteran’s name on the WWI Brunswick County Veteran list, which is also accessible by the blue button on the top right of the webpage.

Photo contributed by Mary Willetts Earp, daughter.
William Edgar Willetts
Winnabow, Brunswick County, NC
US Army
Private
Served:
July 30, 1918 – February 20, 1919

William Edgar Willetts was born and raised in Winnabow, Brunswick County. He was the oldest child of William Henry Sherman  and Annie Eliza Arnold Willetts. Two of his brothers also served, George Finnis Willetts and Fredrick Arnold Willetts.

His Draft Registration shows he was single, living in Winnabow, and farming. He stated he was supporting his father, two brothers, and two sisters. His physical description was medium height and weight, with grey eyes and dark brown hair.

William was the second Willetts brother to receive orders to report for duty. He reported for duty on July 31, 1918, and was sent to Camp Hancock, GA [Source: Ancestry]. He was assigned to 53rd Depot Brigade where his NC WWI Service Card indicated he remained throughout the war. The Depot Brigade was to receive recruits, train them, then send them where needed.

Source: Library of Congress

The construction of Camp Hancock began on July 18, 1917. Construction was completed in November 1917. The camp was abandoned in March 1919.

The NC WWI Service Cards have inconsistencies for some veterans and appear to have more if the veteran did not serve overseas. For example, Joseph S. Smith reported for duty with Pvt Willetts on July 31, 1918. Pvt Smith’s NC WWI Service Card shows he served in the Machine Gun Training Center at Camp Hancock. Yet his application for military headstone (Source: Ancestry) and his military flat marker in Brunswick County show he served in the 13th Provisional Company at Camp Johnson. Walker O. Smith shows the same.

Offline research into Pvt Willetts records would be needed to determine exactly where he served during the war. The Headstone Applications for Military Veterans in Ancestry are only available from 1925-1963.

Pvt Willetts was honorably discharged on February 20, 1919, with a 16 2/3 disability, indicating that the disability was a result of his military service.

According to the Library of Congress blog, injured veterans helped push forward the disability rights movement.  The US Department of Veterans Affairs was eventually created for the treatment of veterans’ disabilities. In addition, the important recognition of psychological injuries began around this time. These three important advances were a result of the physical disabilities of veterans such as the one which resulted from Pvt Willetts’ service.

During the war, 224,000 soldiers suffered injuries that sidelined them from the front. Roughly 4,400 returned home missing part or all of a limb. Of course, disability was not limited to missing limbs; a soldier could come home with all limbs and digits intact yet struggle with mental wounds. Nearly 100,000 soldiers were removed from fighting for psychological injuries; 40,000 of them were discharged. By 1921, approximately 9,000 veterans had undergone treatment for psychological disability in veterans’ hospitals. As the decade progressed, greater numbers of veterans received treatment for “war neurosis.” Ultimately, whether mental or physical, 200,000 veterans would return home with a permanent disability.

“[A] man could not go through that conflict and come back and take his place as a normal human being,” veteran and former infantry officer Robert S. Marx noted in late 1919. Marx played a critical role in establishing the organization Disabled Veterans of the World War (DAV) in 1920. He knew well the sting of disability: Just hours before the war’s ceasefire, he suffered a severe injury after being wounded by a German artillery shell.

With the larger American Legion, founded in 1919, the DAV worked to raise public awareness about disabled veterans, while pressuring the government to adopt programs to address their rehabilitation and reintegration into American society.

Together, the two organizations placed veterans’ disability at the forefront of the push for veterans’ rights and benefits, including for “shell shock” or what today would be classified as PTSD. Due to the organizations’ efforts, in 1921 the U.S. government established the United States Veterans Bureau, a precursor to today’s U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

WWI Service Cards don’t include the injury, but additional records have provided details of injuries such as those sustained by POW/wounded Robert Bollie Stanley and wounded Lindsey Pigott.

A clue to Pvt Willetts’ injury may be found in Cpl John Burt Exum’s letters home, used in George Finnis Willetts’ WWI Profile. Cpl Exum wrote the following on June 11, 1918, less than a month after he began training:

“Russell Peacock and Turl Flowers are in the tent with me. One on one side and the other on the other.”

Charles Russell Peacock and Jarvis Lester Flowers (assumed to be “Turl”) were ordered to report to duty with John Burt Exum on May 26, 1918 [Source: Ancestry].

On June 14, 1918, Cpl Exum wrote:

“I think Turl will get a discharge on account of a broken foot.”

Jarvis Lester Flowers was honorably discharged on August 5, 1918, with a Surgeons Certificate of Discharge and a 16 2/3 percent disability, which matches the disability percentage of Pvt Willetts.

It’s possible that Pvt Willetts’ disability was related to his foot, as percentages are determined based on appendage, etc. There are no records to confirm.

After his honorable discharge, Pvt Willetts returned home to work on the family farm. A few years later he married and began raising a family, continuing to farm throughout his life.

William Edgar Willetts passed away on June 12, 1972, just three days after his younger brother, Frederick Arnold Willetts. On June 14, 1972, the following obituary was published in The Wilmington Morning Star.

William E. Willetts

William Edgar Willetts of Rt. 3 Box 200A, Leland, died in the Cape Fear Memorial Hospital at midnight Monday, following an extended illness.

He was born in Winnabow, the son of the late Williams and Annie Arnold Willetts. He was a retired farmer.

The funeral will be held Thursday at 2 pm in the Chapel of the Andrews Mortuary by the Rev C.B. Hicks. Burial will be in Mill Creek Church Cemetery.

The family will receive visitors Wednesday from 8 pm to 9 pm at Andrews Mortuary.

Survivors include two daughters, Mrs. Wilbur E. Earp of Winnabow, Mrs. Wayne Lewis of Leland, one step-daughter, Mrs. Fred Hansen of Wilmington; two step-sons, W.A. Smith and H.R. Smith, both of Leland; three brothers, F.S. Willetts of Garland, Sidney Willetts of Supply, J.C. Willetts of Winnabow, two sisters, Mrs. Eula Bolling of Leland, Mrs. Eliza Singletary of Supply; six grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

William Edgar Willetts was laid to rest in Willetts Cemetery in Mill Creek. A military headstone is shown.

Read more about the Willetts brothers here: Willetts brothers honored with a family donation

If you would like to help us honor William Edgar Willetts or another Brunswick County WWI veteran, please use the following links:

Click here for the announcement: Announcement: Honor a Brunswick County World War I Veteran
Click here for directions to donate and honor a veteran: How to Honor a Brunswick County World War I Veteran

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