Category Archives: Honor a Veteran

Graveside Honors: High Point, NC

Some supporters of Friends of Fort Caswell Rifle Range traveled to High Point to seek the gravesite of one of Brunswick County’s three WWI veterans awarded medals during their service: Corporal Curtis Lee Smith.

Corporal Smith’s WWI Profile had already been posted but until now, the details and picture of his gravesite were unavailable. His death certificate shows Floral Garden Park in High Point as the cemetery. If his gravesite could be located, then military honors could be verified.

Floral Garden Memorial Park (Cemetery Census) is 44 acres. There is an onsite office and files are available to offer an exact location of a grave. Because the information in findagrave for this cemetery indicated that phone queries could be a problem, an actual visit to the office was made instead. Maps to the gravesite were provided by a very nice gentleman in the office.

Below, the map of the cemetery indicating the correct section, followed by the map of the section indicating his gravesite.

Findagrave accepts GPS coordinates and Plot numbers, both of which were entered after the visit.

Corporal Curtis Lee Smith‘s gravesite is next to his wife, Mary Alice Jones Smith. Both pictures were added to findagrave.

His flat marker is not an official military marker but it does include the words, U.S. ARMY HERO, WWI.

Three Brunswick County men were awarded medals for their service in WWI. We now know the resting places for all of them.

    • Sergeant Forney Boston Mintz
      ★Distinguished Service Cross, Silver Star, Purple Heart with one Oak Leaf Cluster

    • Private Benjamin Bantie Smith (Died of Wounds)
      ★Silver Star, British Military Medal

    • Corporal Curtis Lee Smith
      ★Silver Star

If you are interested in assisting with the discovery of gravesites, please read this post: Memorial Day 2018: Graveside Honors for more information.

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WWI Profile: Erastus I. Nelson 1893-1918

To view this or an earlier profile at any time, click on the veteran’s name on the WWI Brunswick County Veteran list, which is also accessible by the blue button on the top right of the webpage.

Source: Randolph County Public Library
120th Infantry at Camp Sevier, SC
March 16, 1918

Erastus I. Nelson
Leland, Brunswick County, NC
US Army
Private First Class

Served:
September 19, 1917 – August 22, 1918
Overseas:
May 12, 1918 – August 22, 1918
Killed in Action: August 22, 1918

Erastus Nelson was born and raised in Brunswick County. A partial family tree is located in FamilySearch. The 1910 Census and his WWI Draft Registration shows he was working on his father’s farm.

Erastus had a brother who also served, Walter Decator Nelson. See below for additional information about his brother’s service.

On September 19, 1917, Erastus was ordered to report for duty [Source: ancestry.com].

The 120th Infantry was formed with the 119th Infantry, as part of the 30th “Old Hickory” Division as described in previous posts. The roster contains quite a few Brunswick County men. All of the rosters can be found on the World War I Army/Marine Division Rosters webpage

30th Division, 120th Infantry (from Brunswick County)

Name Co.
Pfc Kinnie Benton H
Pvt William C Hewett C Died of Wounds 10/25/1918
Pvt Hanson H Leonard I Wounded 09/19/1918
Pvt Jesse J Leonard D Wounded 10/09/1918
Pvt Claudie H McCall Sup Died of Disease 04/13/1919
Wag George M Milliken Sup
Pvt Edward A Mills M Severely Wounded 09/01/1918
Pfc Erastus I Nelson C KIA 08/22/1918
Pvt Harry L Piggott M KIA 09/29/1918
Pvt Andrew J Robbins F
Pvt Byron Stanley I
Pvt Martin R Willis A

The 120th Infantry trained at Camp Sevier, SC, along with the other units of the 30th Division. They soon began training with French and British instructors covering the use of bayonets, bombs, scouting, trench-warfare and open-warfare. The middle of December 1917 brought an unusually frigid winter that interfered with training and caused hardships, but the men were able to resume training in January.

The trip to NYC to prepare for embarkation began in May 1918. All men had an opportunity to visit the city, which was a great experience for “most of the men.” (no further explanation was given)

Transport from Boston to London was provided by an Australian transport service. The food, therefore, was Australian and not appreciated by the men. The boats were crowded but the weather was good and all submarine attacks were unsuccessful.

The trip to France was completed on June 5, 1918, when all men were given a copy of an autographed letter from His Majesty, George V.

At first, the men were anxious to join the battle.

…for a long time the constant query was “When do we go South?” but in course of time it was changed to “We don’t want to go South.” At Calias the distant thunder of guns could be heard, and the nightly air raids with the accompaniment of bombs, taking their nightly toll of women and children, gave the first touch of war, and opened the eyes of many to the kind of enemy they were to fight.

They were the first troops to enter Belgium. It was July 4th and the village had Belgium and French flags flying from the houses in honor of the American holiday.

In early August, the men were thrilled to have an inspection by King George. It was over in a few minutes but enjoyed by all.

Training was finished and the Division prepared to relieve British troops at the Canal Sector at Ypres.

The entire sector is a ghastly monument to the tenacity and courage of the British soldiers. For four long years they held it against bitter attacks by a determined enemy; to-day it is consecrated ground made sacred by the bodies of hundreds of thousands of Britain’s finest sons; and the few Americans who lie “where poppies bloom”

On the night of August 17-18, the 120th and 119th Infantry relieved the British troops. At this time, Pvt Luther Benton of the 119th Infantry was wounded, as shared in his WWI Profile.

The ground was very low, easily flooded, and the water so near the surface that each shell hole became a little pool. All of the high ground, Observatory Ridge, Passchendaele Ridge, and the famous Mont Kimmel, was held by the enemy. These points of observation enabled the enemy to detect any movement within the sector, and, as a result, daylight movement was of necessity reduced to a minimum, for even small parties would provoke instant and heavy shelling. The Salient was so deep and so narrow it was subjected to shell-fire from front, flanks, and rear. Oftentimes the men in the forward systems believed they were being shelled by their own artillery, when as a matter of fact the shells were from enemy guns on our right and rear.

It was during these operations, on August 22, 1918, that Pfc Erastus Nelson was killed in action.

Between July 4th to September 5th, 1918, the following 120th Infantry casualties were reported.
34 KIA
216 Wounded
1 POW

The Wilmington Morning Star [Wilmington, NC] 29 Sept. 1918, p.8 published this about his death.

The following is a copy of a letter from Lieut. Gross [George] McClelland, chaplain, 120th infantry, 30th division, American Expeditionary forces, to Mr. and Mrs. John C. Nelson, R.F.D. 1, Leland, notifying them of the death of their son, Erastus I. Nelson, who was killed in action August 22:

“Your son met death instantly yesterday afternoon by a direct hit. He was in the line of his duty and died like a man. I wish, as the officiating chaplain at his burial, to command you to the great Comforter of hearts in this your dark but proud hour.

“We buried your son this morning at Nine Elms cemetery with due military honors. A number of the boys from our regiment were present at the service.

“I should like to get a line from you at any time. Meantime, assuring you of my personal sympathy, and with every high personal regard.”

A friend of Private Nelson has received a letter from him, which was written August 17, five days before he paid the supreme price. The letter follows:

“There are so many laws concerning what a solider can and cannot write that I hardly know what a fellow is allowed to say and get his letter past the censor. Anyway I am well and getting plenty to eat, although it is far from being your table.

“We are not working so hard now. This much talked about ‘Sunny France’ is not what I expected to find. Its lots colder here than at home, and is at least 100 years behind the good old U.S.A. in every respect. The more I see of it the more I appreciate America.

“I am having quite a lot of fun with my French. By using my hands I can generally make myself understand. I think I am going to be able to speak French soon. I find more trouble trying to count the money than anything else.

“We are billeted in a French village, but am not allowed to give the name. At present am sleeping in a barn, which is not so bad so long as we are under a roof.

“If at any time you do not hear from me for quite a while do not worry for if anything happens you will be notified at once.”

His remains were returned to the United States in 1921 [Source: ancestry.com] and laid to rest in Nelson Cemetery in Leland, NC.

Source: findagrave
PRIVATE ERASTUS I. NELSON
SON OF J.G. & HARRIET S. NELSON

BORN OCT. 8, 1893
DIED AUG. 22, 1918

KILLED IN ACTION WHILE
SERVING AS AN INFANTRYMAN
WITH AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY
FORCES IN BELGIUM

[Remaining illegible]

Pfc Erastus Iredell Nelson was the first KIA from Brunswick County.
There would be four more.

Information regarding the 120th Infantry was gathered from Official History of the 120th Infantry “3rd North Carolina” 30th Division, From August 5, 1917, to April 17, 1919. Canal Sector Ypres-Lys Offensive Somme Offensive

Additional details about his brother Walter’s service.

Walter was a Wagoner with the 117th Engineer Train, 42nd “Rainbow” Division. The 117th Engineer Train was created entirely with North Carolina men. Wagoner Walter Nelson served with Wagoner Dorman Mercer and quite a few other Brunswick County men. More information will be available when the 42nd Division is covered in later profiles. This is confirmed by his NC WWI Service Card and his US Army Transport Passenger lists [Source: ancestry.com] for both outgoing and incoming, as well as the Roster for the 42nd Division. Yet, his application for military headstone and his military flat marker show “155 Depot Brigade.” The Depot Brigades were to receive, train, equip, and forward replacements (both officers and enlisted men) to replacement divisions of the corps. Walter Nelson had enlisted in the NC National Guard in July 1917, was a member of the 117th Engineer Train in October 1917 when he was transported to France, and remained in the 117th Engineer Train through April 1919 when he returned to the United States.

With all of this evidence from multiple records and the published roster, the assumption is his military flat marker is incorrect.

If you would like to help us honor Erastus I. Nelson or another Brunswick County WWI veteran, please use the following links:

Click here for the announcement: Announcement: Honor a Brunswick County World War I Veteran
Click here for directions to donate and honor a veteran: How to Honor a Brunswick County World War I Veteran

Click the category: Veteran Profile here or at the bottom of any veteran profile post to see all of the veteran profiles published. Follow or subscribe to the blog to stay updated on all new profiles.

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WWI Profile: John W. Carlisle 1887-1919

Source: Soldiers of the Great War, Vol. II
John W Carlisle
Mill Branch, Brunswick County, NC
US Army
Private, First Class

Served:
September 19, 1917 – February 13, 1919
Overseas:
May 12, 1918 – February 13, 1919
Died of Disease: February 13, 1919

John Carlisle was born in Mill Branch, NC, in 1887. He married Lizzie Fowler or Walker (records aren’t consistent) in 1911. His draft registration shows he was married with two children, working as a farmer in Mill Branch. Records show his children were born in 1913 and 1916.

John was ordered to report to duty on September 19, 1917 [Source: ancestry.com]. He was 31 years old.

A third son was born during his training, January 7, 1918, confirmed by the 1920 Census.

Pvt John Carlisle was initially assigned to the 322th Infantry, 81st Division. Many from the 81st Division were moved to supplement the 30th Division and this included Pvt Carlisle. On February 20, 1918, he was transferred to the 119th Infantry, 30th “Old Hickory” Division, and eventually Company K. He served in that division throughout the war, according to his NC WWI Service Card.

Previous posts described the operations of the 119th Infantry until the war ended on November 11, 1918. At that point, the 30th Division moved by rail to Beaumont-sur-Sarthe, Southwest of Paris. They remained there until February 11, 1919, when orders were received to march approximately 30 km to Le Mans, to prepare for embarkation to the United States.

Source: Ancestry.com. U.S., Army Transport Service, Passenger Lists, 1910-1939 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2016.

Pfc John Carlisle did not participate in that march. His name was scratched from the passenger list for USS Huron for return to the United States on March 21, 1919, with the notation, “SOLDIER DIED IN HOSPITAL FEBRUARY 13, 1919.”

Pfc John Carlisle died of pneumonia on February 13, 1919. There has been no record found for the return of his remains to the United States.

Some members of the The Friends of Fort Caswell Rifle Range visited Griffin Cemetery in Ash, NC, recently to pay tribute to Pfc Carlisle and take photos and rubbings of his headstone.

While not an official military headstone, it does include his service on the back of the headstone, as shown.

Notice the American flag displayed.

Rubbings show the words:

JOHN W. CARLISLE PVT. 1316552
CO. K 119TH INF. DIED FEB. 13, 1919

NO. 63
F

The meaning of “No. 63 F” is unclear. Anyone with information is asked to contact the Friends of Fort Caswell Rifle Range.

John’s second son died of hepatitis in May 1919 and was buried in the same cemetery as his father. He was three years old. His oldest son died in 1993 and is buried in Brunswick County. His youngest son fought in many battles in the Italian Campaign in WWII and received a Purple Heart. He died in 1994 and was buried in Salisbury National Cemetery, in Rowan County, NC, with military honors.

This is the last profile for the 119th Infantry. Next week, posts begin for the 120th Infantry of the 30th Division.

If you would like to help us honor John W. Carlisle or another Brunswick County WWI veteran, please use the following links:

Click here for the announcement: Announcement: Honor a Brunswick County World War I Veteran
Click here for directions to donate and honor a veteran: How to Honor a Brunswick County World War I Veteran

Click the category: Veteran Profile here or at the bottom of any veteran profile post to see all of the veteran profiles published. Follow or subscribe to the blog to stay updated on all new profiles.

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Graveside Honors: Navassa, NC

During the Memorial Day weekend, supporters from Friends of Fort Caswell Rifle Range traveled to Navassa to find some Brunswick County WWI veteran gravesites that were not yet located.

Their main hope was locating Manning Hall’s gravesite, a man from Navassa who gave his life during service. Manning Hall died while training at Camp Grant in Illinois. No death certificate for him could be found. But NC death certificates from members of his family placed their burials at Mount Calvary Cemetery. It seemed possible that he was buried with his family.

Mount Calvary Cemetery:
The cemetery was not marked and many of the headstones were unreadable. But there were signs it was still cherished and visited by some.

Manning Hall‘s headstone was spotted immediately. It is not a military headstone but mentions his service. It includes the statement “Erected by his wife Lillie Hall.” They had been married only six months when he died – three of those apart while he served his country.

MANNING HALL
Of Company 161 Depot Brigade
Born at Navassa, NC
Dec. 3, 1889 Died July 11, 1918
Erected by his wife Lillie Hall

Sadly, the gravesites of his family members were not found.

Manning Hall and his family will be featured in a World War I Profile, as will all of the fallen and wounded Brunswick County WWI soldiers. His story can now include his final resting place.

Several other Brunswick County WWI veteran headstones were found and their pictures were also added to findagrave. They include: Joseph Kinston, Mike Mosley, and Johnnie Willis.

Tony Lonnie Waddell’s gravesite was not found. His death certificate indicated he was to be buried in this cemetery.

Next stop was the Mears Cemetery less than a mile away. The Brunswick County GIS listing shows “Meares” but the sign posted at the cemetery shows “Mears.”

The cemetery, along a quiet road, seemed a peaceful resting place.

These Brunswick County WWI veteran headstones were found and their pictures were also added to findagrave: Harry Andrews, and Duncan Merrick. Duncan Merrick’s headstone is leaning as shown.

James Hayes’ gravesite was not found. The application for military headstone showed his headstone was intended for this cemetery.

Finding these headstones and documenting them here and in the planned book, as well as in findagrave is important. It allows their entire story from beginning to end to be told and not forgotten.

If you are interested in assisting with the discovery of gravesites, please read this post: Memorial Day 2018: Graveside Honors for more information.

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Graveside Honors: Boulder City, Nevada

DAR Regent Carol Jutte recently visited Southern Nevada Memorial Veterans Cemetery in Boulder City, Nevada, to honor World War I veteran John Harold Wagner at his graveside.

John Harold Wagner was born in Pittsburgh, PA. He was a Machinists Mate 2nd Class Petty Officer, serving in the Navy during World War I from June 5, 1918 – February 27, 1919.

The Friends of Fort Caswell Rifle Range are encouraging donors and supporters to honor Brunswick County WWI veterans by submitting photos of themselves at the gravesides. Use the Cemeteries list to locate gravesites for Brunswick County WWI veterans.

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WWI Profile: Samuel Goodman Fulford 1894-1966

To view this or an earlier profile at any time, click on the veteran’s name on the WWI Brunswick County Veteran list, which is also accessible by the blue button on the top right of the webpage.

Source: findagrave

Samuel Goodman Fulford
Supply, Brunswick County, NC
US Army
Private

Served:
September 19, 1917 – April 8, 1919
Overseas:
May 11, 1918 – April 2, 1919
Wounded: October 17, 1918

Samuel Goodman Fulford was born and raised in Brunswick County, NC. A family tree can be viewed in FamilySearch. His WWI Draft Registration shows he was single, farming, and living in Supply, NC.

Samuel was ordered to report to duty on September 19, 1917, and was accepted for service on October 4, 1917 [source: ancestry.com]. On October 16, 1917, he joined 30th “Old Hickory” Division, 119th Infantry, Company C. Previous posts describe training, transport to France, and battles, including the breaking of the Hindenburg Line, until the beginning weeks of October 1918.

The 119th Infantry’s final contact with the enemy occurred during October 17-19, 1918. It was during that time that Pvt Fulford was wounded, and Pvt Luther Benton and Cpl Calmer Clemmons were wounded a second time. Pvt Fulford and Pvt Benton recovered by the end of November and early December, returning to duty at that time. Cpl Clemmons’ injuries were severe and required additional hospitalization after returning to the United States. Recall that he was initially reported missing.

The operation that resulted in the three men being wounded began before daybreak on October 17, 1918. The 119th Infantry had just rested for 6 days following their earlier push immediately after the Hindenburg Line assault. Before daybreak on October 17, they lined up at the eastern outskirts of La Haie Mennerese and bore on Vaux Andigny, advancing under an artillery barrage. You can follow their progress on the map below, starting on the middle right and advancing toward the east (right side of map shown below). Companies A (which included Pvt Luther Benton), B, E, and H led the assault with the others in support. At one point, they experienced a very heavy counter barrage from the enemy. At around 11am, the infantry advanced to a railroad cut 2,000 yards west of the village of Ribeauville. The men dug in for the night. This position was very heavily shelled and there were many casualties. Pvt Benton and Pvt Samuel Fulford were wounded at some time during the day’s maneuver.

Source: NC Digital Archives

(To zoom in further, use the map from the Source.)

The 120th Infantry (also in the 30th Division) and a British Regiment on their flanks had fallen behind so little movement was made during the day of the 18th. At 8pm, they began to advance over rough country with only a compass and moonlight. After reaching the eastern edge of Ribeauville, the shelling became heavier and mustard gas shells were falling. They captured Ribeauville, liberating one French civilian, then advanced further, halting at 1:30am on October 19. Cpl Clemmons’ severe injuries were received during this maneuver.

There were no more injuries among the remaining Brunswick County men in the 119th Infantry at this time. Refer to Pvt Luther Benton’s WWI Profile or the World War I Army/Marine Division Rosters for the infantry roster. The infantry continued pushing forward on October 19, but made little progress due to open country and deadly machine gun fire by the Germans. During these three days, the infantry had pushed forward for a total of 5 miles. They then halted, were relieved, and saw no more battles for the remainder of the war.

Between October 16-20, the casualties reported by the 119th Infantry were the following:
KIA: 31
Died of Wounds: 5
Severely Wounded: 47
Slightly Wounded: 145
Gassed: 45
Wounds undetermined: 7

Pvt Samuel Fulford returned to duty on November 26, 1918. The 119th Infantry was transported back to the United States in April 1919 and were mustered out at Camp Jackson, SC. Samuel resumed farming.

Samuel Goodman Fulford passed away on May 8, 1966, at age 71. He had never married. He was laid to rest in Sabbath Home Baptist Church Cemetery in Holden Beach, NC. A military flat marble marker is displayed.

Most of the information gathered was from History 119th Infantry, 60th Brigade, 30th Division. U. S. A. Operations in Belgium and France, 1917-1919

If you would like to help us honor Samuel Goodman Fulford or another Brunswick County WWI veteran, please use the following links:

Click here for the announcement: Announcement: Honor a Brunswick County World War I Veteran
Click here for directions to donate and honor a veteran: How to Honor a Brunswick County World War I Veteran

Click the category: Veteran Profile here or at the bottom of any veteran profile post to see all of the veteran profiles published. Follow or subscribe to the blog to stay updated on all new profiles.

 

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Willetts brothers honored with a family donation

Mary Willetts Earp recently presented Friends of Fort Caswell Rifle Range president Norma Eckard with a check for $500 to honor her father and his two brothers.

All three served in WWI. Mary is the last direct descendant living today.

The Willetts brothers:

Private William Edgar Willetts was honored with a donation by Mary and his niece, Anne Willetts Jones.

Private Frederick Arnold Willetts was honored with a donation by great-nieces Sue Jones Jordan and Maggie Faulkner Harper.

Private George Finnis Willetts was honored with a donation by granddaughters Darlene Willetts McGee, Joann Willetts Neal, and Beth Willetts Osborne.

Mary then gave a touching speech, sharing her thoughts about the “Honor a Brunswick County WWI Veteran” program to raise funds for the WWI memorial planned onsite at the 1918 Fort Caswell Rifle Range.

“Few people know about this war and the sacrifices that were made. It is our responsibility to educate family members and the community.”

She spoke about the formation of the Daughters of the American Revolution chapter in Brunswick County, as she was one of the early members. They struggled through those first years but have now created a strong base of members. The Brunswick Town chapter has supported the stabilization of the rifle range and now the honoring of Brunswick County WWI veterans.

Mary’s involvement in the DAR came naturally, as her family always emphasized the importance of serving their country at home and in the service. Her father and brothers led by example, as she has done for the generations following. Her nieces are also members of the DAR in their communities.

Later, Mary shared this picture of her father and his siblings. She explained that “My family was poor and those clothes are not indicative of how they lived.  I have been told that the traveling photographer rented clothes.”

Pictured are (front row, left to right) Fredrick Arnold Willetts, William Edgar Willetts, (back row) William Henry Willetts, George Finnis Willets (in uniform), and sister Zelphia Eunity Willetts.

Mary first contacted Friends of Fort Caswell Rifle range in March. She continues to reach out to others in the community to inform and update them about the memorial to honor the county’s WWI veterans. Her support is energizing and appreciated.

Note: Donations continue to be received by the Willetts family. This story has been updated to reflect the additions. Thank you!

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Memorial Day 2018

We will not forget.

The 24 Brunswick County men who gave their lives in World War I

Killed in Action: Died of Disease:
PFC Walter S Brock PVT William F Brooks
PVT Harvey T Chadwick PFC John W Carlisle
PVT Jimmie Griffin PVT Carl J Danford
PFC Erastus Iredell Nelson PFC Isaac Davenport
PVT Harry Langdon Pigott Cook David L Dosher
CPL Herbert B Ward Seaman James C Edwards
SGT Robert G Farmer
Died of Wounds: PVT Manning Hall
PVT William Cross Hewett PVT Claudie Hall McCall
PVT Benjamin B Smith PVT Elijah Milliken
PVT Kendrick W Outlaw
PVT Cecil Smith Pierce
PVT Samuel C Swain
PVT Guy Ellis Watson
PVT David Williams
PVT Fred Wilson

 

Soldiers on our WWI Wall of Honor who gave their lives

 

Killed in Action: Died of Accident:
CPL Russell Kellogg Bourne PVT James Hemphill
SGT Richard J. Dennis
PFC Louis “Lolly” B. Doerr Died of Wounds:
Mech Dona J. Dugal PVT Edward Clarkson Bonnell
PFC Wilmer H. Eicke
PVT Ben W. O. Hildebrandt Died of Disease:
PFC Robert Anthony Strzempek PFC Vito Copola
PVT Carl F. Greene

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Graveside Honors: Sergeant Henry Lindon Clemmons 1895-1960

Gwen Causey is pictured here honoring her grandfather, Sergeant Henry Lindon Clemmons, at his graveside in Prospect Cemetery, Supply, Brunswick County, NC.

Sergeant Clemmons has been honored with a donation by his grandchildren Gwen Causey, Stewart Clemmons, Elaine Wright, Julie Robinson, and Edwina Miras.

The Friends of Fort Caswell Rifle Range are encouraging donors and supporters to honor Brunswick County WWI veterans by submitting photos of themselves at the gravesides. Use the Cemeteries list to locate gravesites for Brunswick County WWI veterans.

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Memorial Day 2018: Graveside Honors

Memorial Day is next week.
Many set aside the day to honor veterans at their graveside.

724 World War I veterans have been identified as born, raised, lived, or served in Brunswick County. We encourage you to include the WWI Brunswick County veterans in your Memorial Day plans or throughout the year.

If you take a photograph of yourself alongside a gravesite, the photo will be posted on the website.

A new webpage has been created to help assist in graveside honors.

Honor a Brunswick County WWI Veteran: Cemeteries contains two lists:

  • The 24 Brunswick County WWI veterans who gave their lives.
  • All known gravesites to date, sorted by location (Ash, Bolivia, Holden Beach, etc.)

Many of their final resting places have not been identified.

Would you like to help?

A book is planned to honor the Brunswick County WWI veterans. Cemetery locations should be included for all of the veterans.

To identify which veterans have unknown gravesites, use the Brunswick County WWI Veterans page. The blue button on the right side at the top of the website can also be used.

If there is no “Date of Death” then no gravesite has been identified.

  • If you find one of these graves, send the findagrave information to ftcaswellriflerange@gmail.com and the list will be updated.

Even if the gravesite has already been identified, there may be no photo. If there is a “?” after “Date of Death” then there is no photo of the headstone/flat marker.

  • Take photos of the headstone and/or military flat marker and send to ftcaswellriflerange@gmail.com

Please help us create a complete list of cemetery locations for the WWI veterans of Brunswick County.

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